School of Civil, Environmental and Mining Engineering

Postgraduate research

Further information

A-Z staff research profiles

Current and completed research by our postgraduate students.

Contact

Tanveer Adyel

Phone: (+61 8) 6488 1683
Fax: (+61 8) 6488 1015


Start date

Aug 2012

Submission date

Aug 2016

Curriculum vitae

Tanveer Adyel CV
[text/rtf, 135.12 kb]
Updated 24 May 2013

Tanveer Adyel

Tanveer Adyel profile photo

Thesis

Ecohydrological Dynamics of Constructed Wetlands for Urban Stormwater Treatment

Summary

The research project will examine the dynamic behaviour of constructed wetlands in the treatment of base flow and episodic stormwater run-off events from urban areas within the Swan Coastal Plain, Western Australia. The study will ultimately focus on the Best Management Practices (BMPs) for Water Sensitive Urban Design (WSUD). It will find the insights of mechanism and drivers shaping the spatial and temporal dynamics of nutrients removal efficiency, productivity and respiration within the wetlands. The optimization and modelling of the role of ecohydrological variability on overall performance of wetlands for pollutants removal and nutrients attenuation, water management and dynamic partitioning will be assessed. It is expected to identify the most effective conditions for the maximum pollutants removal efficiency of the studied wetlands in a Mediterranean region like the Swan Coastal Plain and their response to hydrological pulses and storm episodes along with the base flow conditions.

Why my research is important

There are several challenges regarding optimization of treatment performance of wetlands systems in the sandy Coastal Plain environments of Western Australia, where high groundwater tables dominate hydrological and biogeochemical aspects of wetland function. Although design of existing constructed wetlands of this area are based on different geomorphological conditions, a further understanding and quantification of the process as well as pathways of nutrient and contaminant assimilation, attenuation and metabolism and their responses to extremes in flow variability are necessary for optimization of wetlands design and operation.

Funding

  • • UWA Scholarship for International Research Fees (SIRF)
  • • University International Stipend (UIS)
  • • UWA Safety Net Top-Up Scholarship

 

School of Civil, Environmental and Mining Engineering

This Page

Last updated:
Thursday, 19 September, 2013 11:39 AM

http://www.ceme.uwa.edu.au/416645