School of Civil, Environmental and Mining Engineering

Postgraduate research

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Current and completed research by our postgraduate students.

Contact

Feifei Tong

Phone: (+61 8) 6488 8160


Supervisors

Start date

Aug 2010

Submission date

Nov 2014

Curriculum vitae

Feifei Tong CV
[rtf, 106.37 kb]
Updated 06 Jul 2013

Feifei Tong

Feifei Tong profile photo

Thesis

Study on currents and waves around Offshore Tension Leg Platforms

Summary

The need to analyse the waves and flow around ocean structures increases as the oil and gas industry develops into deep oceans, where Tension Leg Platforms (TLP), floating production, storage and off-loading facilities (FPSO) and other ship-shaped production and drilling platforms are commonly seen. Ocean structures are expected to experience huge impact forces when exposed to large waves under severe weather. For breaking waves, occurring when the amplitude of a wave reaches a critical level at which it starts to collapse, simple physical wave dynamic models that assume linear behaviours often become invalid. This is largely because of the breaking-wave induced turbulence. This research focuses on the effects of viscous flow and breaking waves on a Tension Teg Platform (TLP), normally used for the offshore production of oil and gas in deep oceans. So, 1) This study aims to investigate how significant the wave force is and how to improve the design of TLPs to withstand this large impact; 2) Another contribution of this study is that it is capable to capture the alternate shedding of vortices in the wake of the structure, which is one of the main concerns about hydrodynamics around a floating ocean structure that may lead to large vibrations and trigger damages and failures of the structure.

Why my research is important

To understand the flow patterns around these offshore structures is of great significance. One of the main concerns about hydrodynamics around a TLP is that the alternate shedding of vortices in the near wake may lead to large vibration of the structure and trigger damages and failures of the structure. Vortex shedding and wake turbulence induce a periodic pressure distribution around the surface of the structure, resulting in an oscillation force mainly in a direction transverse to the flow. It is obvious that when the structure is flexible and when the vortex shedding frequency is in the adjacent area of the natural frequency of structure, large amplitude of VIM is expected to occur. Although no report has attributed the failure of offshore structures directly to VIM, there is a growing concern that VIM might have played bigger role than we thought in many offshore structure failures.

Funding

  • Scholarship for International Research Fees (SIRF)
  • University International Stipend (UIS)

The free surface flow interfered by four circular cylinders in an in-line arrangement
 

School of Civil, Environmental and Mining Engineering

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Last updated:
Thursday, 19 September, 2013 11:39 AM

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