School of Civil, Environmental and Mining Engineering

New cloud-based app helps engineers collaborate better

Dr James Doherty

Tuesday, 23 May 2017

Geotechnical engineers around the world are now able to undertake research and collaborate better thanks to a cloud-based app developed by an engineering researcher at UWA’s School of Civil, Environmental and Mining Engineering (CEME).

Geotechnical engineers around the world are now able to undertake research and collaborate better thanks to a cloud-based app developed by an engineering researcher at UWA’s School of Civil, Environmental and Mining Engineering (CEME).

Dr James Doherty is a geotechnical engineer and senior lecturer at CEME who specialises in using technology to make data more freely available and easier to share and use.

He’s come up with Datamap, a web-based app that allows engineers to freely access and use the research findings of the National Field Testing Facility in Ballina, NSW.

The Ballina facility consists of a 6.5 ha site on a river plain which is being used to test and improve engineering designs of foundations and pilings in soft clay soils.

Typically, data is presented in PDF figures, which makes re-using it difficult.

Dr Doherty says the more researchers who can access a data set, the more likely it is that the data will be transformed into new and useful information.

Engineers can now log on to Datamap and view aerial images of the Ballina facility, with pins indicating various sites. By clicking on a pin, they can access the data in digital from collected from that experiment and use it in their own projects.

“We’ve got $2 million worth of test data we can now share with the world via Datamap,” explains Dr Doherty.

“It’s is a general application that other people can put their data on and share with the world.

“It’s been made not just to share the Ballina stuff, but for anyone who’s got a project and wants to share it.”

So far, the Datamap is being used by 450 engineers in 48 countries.

Dr Doherty says the apps were designed using Amazon web services which means they’re completely cloud-based, no external software is needed, all data is saved to the cloud and users can access it from anywhere.

“These technologies are being lined up so we can solve any type of complex mathematical problem at scale in the cloud and make it available world-wide,” he says.

Engineers and researchers can log on and access Datamap at www.geocalcs.com/datamap and LAP at www.geocalcs.com/lap

There’s also a YouTube video.

 

Media references


Tony Malkovic @TonyMalkovic

 

School of Civil, Environmental and Mining Engineering

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Last updated:
Thursday, 15 June, 2017 10:32 AM

http://www.ceme.uwa.edu.au/3013201